Self-blowing torch

Abstract

Claims

Sept. 4, 1923- 1,467.07() F. P. SCH MITT SELF BLOWING TORCH Filed June 1, 1922 WITNESSESS mvm'pn JM @JM ATTORNEYS Patented Sept. 4, 1923.. warren s r eras FRANCIS P. SCHMITT,OF LEETSDALE, YPENNSYLVANIA, ASSIGNOR TO PEERBLOW MANUFACTURING COMPANY, OF LEETSDALE, PENNSYLVANIA, A CORPORATION OF PENNSYLVANIA. Application filed June 1, T will whom it may concern: Be it known that I, FRANCIS P. SGHMITT, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Leetsdale, in the county of Allegheny and State of Pennsylvania, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Self-Blowing Torches, of which the following is a specification. This invention relates to a self-blowing torch, and particularly to a device of this character adapted for use by electrical wiremen in splicing or for other similar purposes. It is an object of the invention to provide a self-blowing torch which is simple in construction, which comprises relatively few parts, and in which the parts are so arranged as to produce an effective heating flame in a relatively short time and in a highly ellicient manner. It is a special object of the invention to provide a device of the character referred to in which a constant supply of oxygen to the heating flame is secured so as to form a Bunsen flame. It is a further special objectof the in vention to arrange the several parts of the apparatus so as to dispose the superheater tube in the same vertical plane as the lighting and vaporizing tubes and in which the superheater tube Wlll extend well within the space between the said lighting and vaporizing tubes thus utilizing the heat radiated therefrom. It is still a further object of the invention to provide a simple form of superheater tube not only disposed as above set forth, but which has a curved deflecting end which enables the heat fLom the flame and that radiated from the heated parts adjacent thereto to be utilized to the fullest extent. In the accompanying drawings Fig. 1 is a front elevation of one form of construction embodying the invention; Fig. 2 a vertical transverse sectional view with parts. in elevation of the form illustrated in Fig. 1; Fig. 3 ,a side elevation of a modification illustrating the preferred embodiment; and Fig. 4: a front elevation of the modified form shown in Fig. 3. In the drawings, the torch is illustrated as comprising the main receptacle or container 1, preferably cylindrical in form, having a SELF-BLOWINGTORCH. 1922. Serial No. 565,186. ,top and a bottom 3. The container 1 is provided with a partition 4 which divides the same into two fuel chambers or compartments 5 and 6, the uppei fuel compartment serving as a supply for the vaporizing tube, and the lower fuel compartment 6 as a supply for the lighting-tube. The compart ments 5 and\ 6 are provided with the outlets 7 and 8, respectively, in the sides thereof, which outlets are equipped with the suitable closure plugs 9 and 10, respectively. These outlets are utilized for filling the compartments which may be conveniently done by holding the container 1 on its side in a substantially horizontal position with the closure plugs located at the upper side thereof. The top 2 and partition 4 are each providedwith an opening substantially in the center thereof through which extends a'tube 11 having the lower end 12 thereof open and 4 in communication with the compartment. 6, the upper end of the tube 11 extending above the top 2 and forming a lighting tube 13. The lighting tube not only extends above the top 2 but is bent forwardly and is curved throughout its extent, as clearly illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3, the lighting tube 13 forming a continuation of the tube 11 and being open at its upper end 14. The wick 15 is disposed within the tube 1113, said wick having its lower end depending within the compart ment 6 and extending at its upper end within the opening 14 so that a light may be applied thereto. Another comparatively small open tube 16 is carried within the tube 1113, the lower end thereof being in communication with the upper portion of the compartment 6 and its upper end positioned within the open end 14 of the lighting tube. This small tube serves to relieve any excess pressure of gas which may be formed within the compartment 6 and conducts it to the lighting flame at the upper end of the tube 18, also functioning as a vent pipe to admit air to compartment 6 A cap 17 is provided which is adapted to be placed in position over the open end 14 of the lighting tube to extinguish the flame 'at the end thereof, the cap cooperating with a band 18 embracing the upper end of the lighting tube and adapted to be held in place by frictional engagement with the said band. When the cap is not in position on the upper -ner similar to the lighting tube 13. end of the lighting tube to extinguish the flame and prevent evaporation of the fuel, the same is disposed upon a knob 19, located at a convenient position upon the top 2, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2. I The top 2 is provided with a second opening in which the lower 0 en end of a vaporizing tube 20 is fixed, t e vaporizing tube extending upwardly and forwardly, being curved throughout its entire extent in a H1121}?- e vaporizing tube, however, is considerably longer than the lighting tube and pro ects therebeyond, the two tubes being disposed 1n the same vertical plane, as shown in Fig. 1. The outer end of the vaporizing tube 20 is 21 in the forward central portion of which is mounted a screw plug 22, the plug 22 being pnovided to facilitate the insertion of the wick 23 which completely fills the tube 20. The wick 23 depends within the fuel com partment 5 a sufiicient distance to be constantly immersed in the fuel contained therein. A U-shaped super-heater tube is indicated at 24, the limbs of which extend from opposite sides f the cap 21, being in communication with the interior of the vaporizing tube. The superheater tube is disposed between the lighting tube and vaporizing tube, ex tending a substantial distance within the space between the said tubes and having its bridge portion 25 located a substantial distance to the rear of-the openend 14 of the lighting tube. The bridge portion25 is provided at its forward slde and at a point midway between the limbs of the superheater tube with a vapor or gas discharge outlet 26. In the preferred construction illustrated in Fig. 3, the superheater tube consists of but a single tube 27 connected at its forward end with the interior of the vaporizing tube through the cap 21. and having its closed rearward end 28 curved so as to form a deflecting surface. The curved end 28 is provided at its forward side with a gas or vapor discharge outlet'29 similar to the discharge orifice 26 shown in Figs. 1 and 2. The entire length of the tube 27 is disposed in the same vertical plane as the lighting and vaporizing tubes, its rearward portion extending well within the space between the lighting and vaporizing tubes with its discharge orifice 29 at a substantial distance behind the open end of the lighting tube. In this preferred construction the parts are so arranged that the discharge from the orifice 29 is in a direction inclined slightly above the horizontal. Any suitable hydrocarbon fuel may be used, alcohol being preferred, the compartments 5 and 6 being filled through the outlets 7 and 8 in the manner previously described. and one in which In operation, a light is formed at the upper end of the lighting tube 13. The heat from the flame of the lighting tube plays directly upon the superheater tube and the vaporizing tube 20 which causes the fuel fed through the wick 23 to be. vaporized, the vapor being discharged from the vaporizing tube through the tube 24 or tube 27, escaping fromthe discharge orifice 26 or 29 as the case may be. The vapor or gas during its passage through the tube 24,01 27 is heated to a high point being discharged in a superheated condition. c t v Due to the positioning of the discharge orifice at a substantial distance behind the open end of the lighting tube, the vapor orclosed, beingprovided with a cap member gas discharged therefrom carries with it a supply of oxygen as it passes into the flame of the lighting tube, thus producing a Bunsen-burner flame. During the use of the torch all portions of the deviceadjacent the flame proper, also the lighting flame, become heated. By disposing the superheater tube between the lighting and va orizing tubes and extending the same we 1 within the space between the said tubes, advantage may be taken of heat which is radiated from these heated parts. In ther words, the superheater tube is positioned so that any heat radiated from these parts will be directed thereagainst to assist in superheating the vapor as it passes, from the vaporizing tube to the discharge orifice. In the preferred form shown in Fig. 3, the utilization of all the heat from the flames as well as the heat radiated from the adjacent parts, is rendered still more effective than in the form illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 on account of the disposition of the entire superheater tube 27 in the same vertical plane as the lighting and vaporizing tubes and by forming the rearward portion of the superheater tube as a deflecting surface. Due to the curved rearward end of the superheater tube nearly all the heat radiated from the heated portion of the lighting tube, as wellas the heat dissipated rearwardly from the flames, is deflected along the super- 7 heater tube thus directly enhancing the efficiency of the device. Further, heat which is not directly deflected along the superheater tube is prevented from passing rearwardly being .deflected upon adjacent parts of the lighting and vaporizing tubes. thus indirectly increasing the efficiency of the torch. It is thus seen that the invention provides a simple and convenient form of self-blowing torch, one in which oxygen is constantly supplied to the fuel flame to secure a Bunsen-burner effect, one in which the vaporized fuel is superheated bycxtcnd' h the superheatcr tube well witbiu the r between the lightin and van operation is greatly enhanced by the peculiar form and arrangement of parts. I claim: 1. A self-blowing torch comprising a receptacle having a plurality of fuel chambers, a vaporizin tube extending upwardly and forwardly from one of said chambers and having a closed outer end, a wick'therein, an open-ended lighting tube extending upwardly and forwardly from another fuel chamber also provided with a wick therein, the lighting tube being disposed in the same vertical plane as the vaporizing tube spaced from and disposed entirely below the vaporizing tube with the tip of the former terminating short of the outer extremity of the latter, a: superheater tube connected tothe vaporizing tube and extending backwardly a considerable distance and lying within the space between the vaporizing and lighting tubes, the superheating tube having a vapor discharge port behind and spaced from the end of the lighting tube. 2. A self-blowing torch comprising a .receptacle having a plurality of fuel chambers, a vaporizing tube extending upwardly and forwardly from one of said chambers and having a closed outer end, a wick therein an open-ended lighting tube extending upwardly and forwardly from another fuel chamber also provided with a, wick, the lighting tube being disposed in the same vertical plane as the vaporizing tube spaced from and disposed entirely below the vaporizing tube with the tip of the former terminating short of the outer extremity of the latter, a superheater tube connected to the vaporizing tube and extending backwardly a considerable distance and lying within the space between the vaporizing and lighting tubes whereby the same is partially heated by radiation from said tubes the entire su erheater tube lying in the same vertical p ane as the said vaporizing and f li'ghting tubes, the extremity of the superheater tu e being curved todeflect the heat 'from th lighting tube and flamealongthe superheater tube, said curved extremity having a vapor discharge port therein behind and spaced from the end of the lighting tube. 3. A self-blowing torch comprising a receptacle having a plurality of fuel chambers, a vaporizing tube extending upwardly and forwardly from one of said chambers and having a closed outer end, a wick therein, an open-ended lighting tube extending upwardly and forwardly from another fuel chamber also provided with a wick, thelighting tube being disposed in the same vertical glane as the vaporizing tube spaced from an disposed entirely below the vaporizing tube with the tipof the former terminating short of the outer extremity of the latter, a superheater tube connected to the vaporizing tube and extending backwardly a considerable distance and ,lyin Within the space between the vaporizing an lighting tubes whereby the same is partially heated by radiation from said tubes, the superheater tube being entirely disposed in the same vertical plane as the said vaporizing and lighting tubes and having a closed end adjacent to which is a vapor discharge port located behind and spaced from the open end of the lighting tube, the superheater tube being curved throughout a portion of its length at its closed extremity whereby to serve as a deflector. In testimony whereof, I sign' my name. FRANCIS P. SGHMITT. Witness: Enwm- O. JoHNs.

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Cited By (1)

    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle
    US-2628671-AFebruary 17, 1953Sherman Harry, Silverman Myer Allen, Liberman HymanWick-type liquid fuel hand torch having wick-fed retort