Process of embedding cords in rubber

Abstract

Claims

Au M, 1923. 11,464,632 H. N. WAY N E PROCESS OF EMBEDDING CORDS IN RUBBER Filed April 15, 1918 35 mixed or compounded with-ingredients suit- -PatentedAug. M, was. UNHT STS Tiaesaa ear uric. HEB/BERT N. WAYNE, OF 130% ANGELEQCALIFGRJ. riaooisss or nmnnnnme conns IN Rosana; Application filed ltpril 15, 1918. Serial No. 228,691. . To all itmag concern: 1 Be it known that I, HERBERT N. WAYNE, a citizen of the United States, residin at Los Angeles in the county of Los ngel'es; State of California, have invented ne and useful Improvements in Processes of Embedding Cords in Rubber, of which the following is a specification;- This invention relates to processes for em-' bedding cords in rubber, or for forming corded rubber sheets and the like; and the object of the invention :is to provlde a simple and eficient means of embedding cords tion to unite and coalesce to form a single 'body or sheet of parallel cords embedded in rubber, and specifically, of forming a corded rubber sheet or the like. The process has as its basis the coating Witha rubber or other plastic compound of a fibrous cord under very high. pressure thereby forcing the compound into the fibers of the cord to insure perfect impregnation and then layin lengths of this impregnated cord alongside each other while the coatin is still plastic and in a condiin rubber. The recess is preferably carried on continuous y, with the second ste following immediately after the first step,-so that the lengths of. coated cords are laid alongside eac other while the rubber compound 18 still fresh and warm from the machine which performs the coating operation. Wherein in these specifications or claims the term rubber is used' it means rubber able for the purpose intended. v The process will now be best understood from the following description of a pre- ,ferred specific form thereof, reference for this purpose being had to the accompanying drawings in which- Fig. 1 shows a sideelevation of an appa ratus adapted to perform the process; Fig. 2 is a plan thereof; Fig. 3 is an enlarged detail section taken on line 3 -3 of Fig. 2; Fig. 4 is a view illustrating the condition of the cord as it comes from the coating machine; and Fig. 5 is a view illustrating the under great pressure and in quantity and thickness of rubber desired. I prefer to make this coating as thin as possible, consistent with the results wished to be obtained; and it may be an object in this step of the process to have as much of the rubjber-pass iutoand impregnate the cord as is practicable. The coated cord emerges from' machine 10 as indicated at C, and passes onto a tension sheave 11, passing once around that sheave and then passing on at b" onto a belt or apron '12, or any other suitable winding means by means of which successive lengths of the". cord may be laid alongside each other. I prefer to usea belt 12 running over spaced drums 13; and means may be provided at 14 for driving one of the drums'at suitable speed. I herein explain mechanism for winding only one cord at a time; but it will be readily understood that two or more cords mav be run to- A gether, side by side,onto the winding belt or drum. The tension sheave 11 alsoforms a guide for the coated cord. This sheave is, internally screw-threaded and runs on the horizontal screw-threaded shaft 15, the threads being of sucha pitch as to advance the sheave 11 across on the shaft 15 at just the proper speed to feed the cord C laterally across the belt 12 to wind the cord in a single layer upon the belt. In order to provide a proper tension, the sheave 11 may beprovided with a friction means which may include a split hub 16 having a tapering screw-threaded interior with a nut 17 thereon, so that by adjusting the nut the amount of friction on shaft 15 may be adjusted. To keep the successive convolutions of the coated cord up' against each other, I may use a small pulley or roller 20 mounted on a slider 21 sliding on a transverse rod 22 and pulled over in a direction indicated in Fig. 2 by a suitable weight 23. This weight pulls the pulley over in the direction indicated and "keeps the coated cord up laterally against the last convolution laid, so as to keep a good contact between all the succeeding convolutions of the coated cord. When these successive lengths of the coated cord are brought into contact with each other, the rubber, which is still fresh, warm, and plastic, adheres and may unite or coalesce, or partially unite or coalesce; so that the cross section of the finished article is somewhat as shown in Fig. Unifica Q eter-a2 rubber R whose surfaces may be more or. - less smooth and fiator more or less ribbed, depending on just how the rubber'coatings have coalesced. When a complete. annular band of the finished product has thus been made, it may be removed and cut up into sheets or used in any other manner desired. For certain uses, as for endless belting, deckle straps, printing blankets, etc., the continuous band will be left in its'form herein described. For other 'uses, as tire fabric for producing cord tires, steam and cold water packings, and other uses which are not necessary here to describe, the completed annular band will be cut up into sheets of suitable form and size. Although the fresh warm rubber a'vill adhere together when it comes into contact with itself, it does not adhereto any smooth cool surface. In order to keep the rubber coating from rubbing against itself in pass- 'ing over the tension sheave 11., I provide a pair of rollers 25 above the tension sheave. The incoming cord passes on one side of one of these rollers, while the outgoing cord passes on the other side of the other roller, thus spreading thetwo parts of the coated cord apart at the top of the sheave where they would be otherwise liable to rub against each other. The roller25 may be mounted'upon a bracket 26 supported from a hub 27 mounted on. shaft 15 to slide thereon. Shaft 15 is held stationary and hub "While it will be understood that I have described a form of machinery which is suitable to the carrying out of my process, I do not limit my process to be carried out by such mechanism, neither do I limit the process itself to the. particular and specific 'detailsherein described, except as is stated in the" following claims. Having described a preferred form of my invention, I claim: l. The herein described method of embedding cords in rubber. comprising first continuously coating a cord with unvulcanized rubber. in tubular form so that the cord is continuously enclosed in a tubing of unv'ulcanized rubber, and then forming a sheet of elastic fabric therefrom by them immediately and continuously laying successive lengths of the coated cord alongside each other while the rubber is fresh, thereby to allow the rubber coatings of the cord lengths to adhere to form a sheet. 2. Theherein described method of embedding cords in rubber, comprising first continuously coating a cord with unvul canized rubber in tubular form so that the cord is continuously enclosed in a tubing of uni'ulcanized rubber, and then forming a sheet of elastic fabric therefrom by then immediately and continuously laying successive lengths of "the coated cord alongside each other while the rubber is fresh, thereby to allow the rubber coatings of the cord lengths to adhere to form a sheet, maintaining on the length being laid a continuous lateral pressure tending to force that length over laterally against the adjacent length previously laid. 3. The method of making rubberized cord fabric which consists in coating the cord with hot plastic rubber, and then assembling a series of the coated strands in cohesive relation to form a web. 4. The method of making rubberized cord fabric which consists in surrounding the individual strands with rubber rendered plastic by heat, and assembling a series of the warm coated strands coherently in the form of a Web. In witness that I claim the foregoing I have hereunto subscribed my name this 5th day of April, 1918; HERBERT N. WAYNE. Witness: VIRGINIA F. Bamnenn.

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