Process and device for removing the connecting threads in embroidered fabrics

  • Inventors: NANNY FRITZ
  • Assignees: Nanny Fritz
  • Publication Date: August 07, 1923
  • Publication Number: US-1464289-A

Abstract

Claims

' Aug. 7, 1923. 1,464,289 . F. NANNY PROCESS AND DEVICE FOR REMOVING THE GONNECTING THREADS IN EMBROIDERED FABRICS Filed Aug. 29 1921 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 2 .t 6 N .m 1 s n e E 8 R.h. H S T 2 G N I T C E m s1 w62 I9 ERl VHB, TA N F9 NMDZ AIM- NV g OEu MDA FEM RRd www FEF E C TL v E D D N A S. S E C O R P Aug. 7, 1923. Patented Aug. 7, 1923. :FRITZ NANNY, or HnRisnU, SWITZERLAND. rRoCnss AND DEVICE roR Riiiaovine rein coNNncriNe rrIRnaDs IN niaRRoIDnRnD FABRICS. Application led August 29, 19:21. Serial No. 485,433. (GRANTED UNDER THE ?ROVS\`TS 0F THE ACT 0F MILLItC- 3, 1921, 4i STAT. L., 1313.) '0 all whom it 'may concern.' Be it known that l, FRITZ NNNr, a citizen of the Republic of fdwitzerland, residino` at Herisau, Switzerland, have invented certain new and useful improvements ina .Process and Device for Removing the Connecting lhreads in Embroidered Fabrics (for which 1 have filed applications in Switzerland June Sth, 1918, Patent No. 79,781; in Switzerland August 3d, 1918, Patent No. 93,240; in Switzerland March 12th, 1919, Patent No. 83,430; in Germany August `14th, 1919, Patent- No. 325,877, and in Austria ldepteinber 23d, 1919, application No. A. @M2-19) 5 and 1 do hereby declare the following to be a clear, full, and exact description. of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the saine, rei' erence being` had on the accompanying drawings, and to letters or figures of reference maiked 'thereon7 which form a part of this specilication. This invention relates to improvements in a process and a device for removingconnecting threads in embroidered fabrics. The embroidery on fabrics usually comprises patterns which consist of a number of isolated figures and in the manufacture of a pattern the thread is carried from one ligure to another so as to leave a number of connecting threads passing over `the intervening spaces. These connecting threads have to be removed.` i 1n the process according to the present invention the embroidered fabric provided with the connecting threads treated with means for causing said threads to be raised. from the fabric and thereafter the fabric is singed for burning ofil the connecting threads, whereb-y the velocity of the moving fabric and the size of the singeing flame must be chosen so that the burning takes place partially whereupon the glowing parts of the comiecting threads are extinguished. The device for carrying out the aforementioned process is characterized by at least one group each of the following means which are mentioned in the order in which they are arranged: means for raising the `various rows 12 and 13 of burners. connecting threads, means for burning or singeing said threads and means for extinguishing the burning threads. The connecting` threads can be cut or severed lirst by special cutting machines or by hand and then the fabric can be treated according to the aforementioned process for removing the connecting threads or preferably the severing as well as the removing of the connecting thread is effected by the above mentioned process. Severalconstructioiial examples for carrying out the process according to the inventiony are illustrated on the accompanying drawings, in which: `l `ig. 1 is a cross-section through a rstconstructional example of the device. Fig. 2 shows a second forni of the device in cross-section. Fig. illustrates a third constructional `example of the device. Figs. l and show details. Referring now to F ig. l, 1 denotes the enibroidcred fabric which is moved over the guide rollers 2 and to a rotary bush 5 provided with very hard bristles which brush is i adapted to be adjusted by means of a hand wheel 4': in the directiontowards and away from a roller 6 serving to hold the fabric in `position and below which a guard plate 7 is provided. 8 denotes the supply pipe for ycombustible gas which is distributed by means of the conduits 97 1() and 11 to the w n i4, 3f and 86 arcguide rollers and 15 is an ad- `justable brush which acts on the fabric stretched between the rollers 36 and 3T. 17` and 18 are guide rollers. 19 denote a lire extinguishing or quenching means, which for instance may consist of a water spraying apparatus or a steam nozzle. 20 and 21 are squeezing rollers pressed `together byr a weight 21", 22 and 23 are guide rollers by means of which the fabric is guided over smoothing organs 2i, i. e. curved surfaces clad with wood, to which organs or surfaces the fabric is pressed by means of rollers 25 which act by their own weight. Finally the fabric passes between feed rollers 2G, 27 to a device adapted to lold up the fabric lili leaving the machine. This device consists of a pivotally mounted lever arm 28 to the end of which two rollers 50 and 51 are fixed between which the fabric is caused to pass. The lever arm 28 is swung to and fro by means of a crank disc 52 and a connecting rod 53. f The drive of the machine is effected from a counter-shaft 54 to which pulleys 55 are fitted, from which a belt or cord 56 actuates the rotating brush 15, another cord 57 imparts rotation to the brush 5 and a further cord 58 actuates the feed rollers 26, 27 while a further flexible member 59 imparts rotation to the crank disc v52. 29, 30 and 31 designate guard plates and 32 denotes a trough. The operation of the above described device is as follows: The rotating brush 5 causes the connecting threads which in this case it is assumed are severed previous to the fabric being subjected to the process of removing said threads and which lie loosely on one side of the fabric t-o be raised and the threads are burned or singed by the two rows of burners 12 whereupon the severed connecting threads that are on the other side of the fabric are raised by the rotatingV brush 15 and singed by the rows of burners 13. As the connecting threads are sometimes of a certain length the whole length of these threads is not completely burned off by the aforementioned operation but only their outer points are singed and the glow-V ing parts of the threads are then extinguished by the extinguishing means 19. Thus the burning of said threads occurs in steps. The glowing connecting threads singed by the rows of burners 12 and there-v after pressed to the fabric by the roller 16 cannot cause any damage to the fabric during the short time which the fabric moving at a high speed requires to pass from the roller 16 to the extinguishing means 19. The squeezing rollers 20, 21 which are als ways moist on account of the moist fabric passing between them cause the complete extinguishing of the parts of the connecting threads which may still be glowing and press the moisture out. of the fabric .which moisture collects in the trough 32. Upon a second passage of the fabric through the de vice the charred parts of the connecting threads are brushed off the fabric by the action of the brush 15, whereupon further arts of the connecting threads are burned off until the whole connecting threads are removed by a repeated treatment. It is evident that the device could also be modified in such a way that several groups each consisting kof means for raising the con-` necting threads, of a burner row and of ex-V tinguishing means are arranged in series. Instead of the rotating brush (or in addition to said brush) an air iet may be used for raising the connecting thread. To this end an air conduit 38 is provided extending in a direction perpendicular to the direction in which the fabric moves which conduit is provided with a row of nozzles 39 extending ap` proximately over the whole width of the fabric and through which nozzle either compressed air is forced against the fabric or air is sucked in. 1n the embodiment of the invention illustrated in Fig. 2, 3 denotes the guide roller over which the fabric passes to the brush 5 by which the connecting threads of one side of the fabric are raised or by which brush, when the fabric passes a second time the deviceI the singed parts of the connecting threads which have been burned during a previous passage of the fabric through the device are brushed off, thereupon the fabric reaches the rows of burners 12. At some, little distance from the brush 5 an air con` duit BA1 is provided extending over the whole width of the fabric` to which conduit a con` tinuous row of nozzles35 is fixed, the nozzles ending near the fabric. Each nozzle opening has the shape of a narrow gap the longitudinal direction of which extends perpen dicularly to the direction of movement of the fabric and the total length of said gaps corresponds approximately to the width 'of the fabric. After the fabric has passed the rows of burners 12, it is lead to the brush 15 by which the other side of the fabric is acted upon in the same manner as the brush 5 has acted on'the one side of the fabric. The arrangement of the guide rollers 33, 36 and 37 is similar to that shown in Fig. 1. Below the brush 15 an air conduit38 fitted withnozzles 39 of the same type as the air conduit 30 and the nozzles 35 is provided. The fabric moves then past the rows of burners 13 and to the extinguishing means 19. Iffcompressed air be projected through the nozzles 35 and 39 towards the fabric the effect is attained that at a certain force of the air jet the severed or already partly singed connecting threads are raised morel or less, so that they are separated from the fabric andmay be acted upon by the flame of the burners. 1f a suction action is carried out by the nozzles a raising of the connecting threads is also effected. Insteadv of treating fabrics with which the connecting threads have already been severed by a special cutting machine or by hand and to remove lthe cut connectingl threads on the device according to the invention by singeing or burning the severing` of the connecting threads may advantageously be effected-durin g the same operation by which they severed connecting ythreads are sing'ed. The severing of the threads can be attained by raising the connecting threads which form loops in their raised position; 'Six on passing the burner flames the loops are at some point at least so much singed that by a subsequent action of the brushes they can be severed if the severing `has not already been caused by the flame. Referring,r now to the construetional example illustrated in Fig. 3, 3 and 6 designate guide rollers by which the fabric l is caused to pass to the means for raising,` `the connecting threads which means consist of a row of nozzles 35. again connected to a conduit Se extending' across the whole width of the fabric 1. rf he openings of the nozzles may have the shape of a narrow extending; along the effectivelength of the conduit 34 as is shown in detail in Fig. 1l or separate nozzles 48 may be provided close to each other along the conduit 34. Plate strips e() are soldered to the conduit Bel, the free ends of said strips being bent and projecting beyond the Lap of the nozzles. rlhe conduit 34 is connected to an exhaustfan not shown in the drawing. At a certain strength of the air current induced by the suction action the connecting` threads are raised and form loops. The bent ends 4l of the severing3 fingers or strips prevent the fabric from being sucked towards the nozzles and from bulging. At a little dis tance from the row of nozzles the row of burners lf2 is arranged through the flames of which the raised connecting4 threads are moved whereby `they are singed at some spot. By means of a further row of nozzles and a second row of burners l2 the same treatment is repeated whereby the loops of the connecting,` threads which have not been sinned by the first treatment are now sing-ged while the threads already severed are partly burned off. The rotating brush 42 is intended to sever the loops formed by the connecting threads which are slingert but not severed, so that the free ends of said threads may be burned off upon subsequent passages. ln this way the cutting or severing of the connecting' threads is effected at the same time as the burning of the severed connecting' threads. After the fabric has passed (as in Figs. l and 2) the guide rollers 33, 3G and 37, on which passante the outer side of the fabric is acted upon by the rotating' brush l5, said side of the fabric is subjected to the action of burners 13 which singe the loop formed by the connecting threads and the severed parts of the connecting threads. The row of air nozzles 413 and the second row of burners 13 act in a similar manner on this other side of the fabric as to the row of nozzles 85 and the second row of burners l2 acts upon the first side of the fabric. f claim: y l.' A. process for removing the connecting threads from embroidered fabrics, which rlhe nozzles 35 are comprises stretching the embroidered fabric between supporting means, raising the connecting threads while so supported, mehr taining the threads so raised while between said supporting means and burning the raised threads. f 2. Aprocess for removing` the connectingthreads from embroidered fabrics, which comprises passing the fabric in stretched condition between spaced supports, raising the connecting threads from the fabric and then burning the raised threads r-:hile the fabric is maintained stretched between the supports. i 3. A process'for removing the connectingl threads from embroidered fabrics, which comprises passing; the fabric substantially horizontally, while stretched, between spaced supports, raising the connecting` threads and burning them while the fabric is maintained stretched between said supports. d. A process for removing the connectinir` threads from embroidery, which comprises passing the fabric substantially horizon tally, while stretched7 between spaced snpperts, and while the fabric is under tension raising the threads fr in the under surface of the fabric by suction and simultaneously drawing the fabric down to a flame to burn said threads. i 5. A process for removing the connecting` threads from embroidered fabrics, which comprises stretching the embroidered fabric between supporting1 means, raising the connestingthreads while so supported, maintaining the threads so raised while between said supporting means, burningthe raise'l threads, and extinguishing the ignited threads. A 6. A 'process for removing the connectinnl threads from embroidered fabrics, which comprises stretching the embroidered fabric between supporting means, and while so stretched raisingn the connecting threads on one side of the fabric and burning them, then reversing the fabric and similarly raising and burningthe connecting threads on the other side, and then quenchingV the burning threads. 7. A process for removing` the connecting;` threads from embroidered fabrics, which comprises passingy the fabric horizontally in stretched condition betr/'een spaced supports, and while so supported raising the threads from the fabric and burning them. reversing` the fabric and similarly raising and burning' the threads on the opposite side of the fabric, and then passing a quenching fluid through the fabric. 8. A process for removing the connecting threads from embroidered fabrics, which comprises stretching the embroidered fabric between supportingF means, severing and raising the connecting threadswhile so sup- :will ported, maintaining `the threads'so raisedl while between said supporting means and burning the raised threads. 9. A process for removing` the connecting,` threads from embroidered fabrics, which comprises passing the fabric substantially horizontally in stretched condition between spaced supports, and while travelling, vso supported., severing the threads, raising the threads by suction. burning the raised threads, reversing` the fabric and similarly. severing` and burning;` the connecting` threads on the opposite side, then passing` a quenching medium through they fabric, and finally squeezing the quenching` medium from the fabric. lO. A machine for removing the connecting threads from embroidered fabrics, comprising' means adapted to raise the connecting; threads from the fabric ground, means for singeing` the raised threads, means for extingaiishing` the glowingu parts of the singed threads, and means for moving the fabric past the `afore--inentioned means at such arspeed that the burfnng` ofthe threads occurs in steps. i l1. A machine for removing' the connectingr threads from embroidered fabrics, coniprisinggj means adapted to raise the connecting threads from the fabric ground, inc/fins for singeing the raised threads, ineens for extinguishing the glowing' parts of the singed threads, means adapted to perform a rubbing action on the surfaces of the fabric for severing singed connecting threads, and means for ino'vingthe fabric past said aforementioned means at such a .speed that the burning` ofthe threads occurs 1n steps. l2. A. machine for removing the connecting threads from ein roidered fabrics, comprising spaced guide rolls over which the fabric is passed iny sti-etched condition, means between the rolls for firstraising; the threads from the fabric, and means between said rolls for` then burning' the raised threads. i 13. A. machine for remo ving; the conne-cting threads from embroidered fabrics, coinprising spaced guide rolls over which lthe fabric. is passed, thread ra means between said rolls, igniting burners also between said rollsland arranged past said thread raising; means, and quenching' means to quench the ignited threads. lat. A, machine for removingthe connecting threads from embroidered fabrics, coin- Aprising epaceflguide rolls over which the fabric is passed in stretched condition, severing fingers arranoed between said rolls, snc-l i'ion means arr ged to draw the severed threads from the fabric, and burning' means to burn the raised threads, said suction

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